How to Talk about Relations between Indigenous Peoples and Europeans

“A lot of common terms may seem ‘neutral’ but reinforce racism. A teacher’s textbook case.”

Wilderness? Permanent? More loaded terms

“Wilderness” is another problematic term. It implies a place that humans neither modify nor call home. So when we attempt to convey respect for Indigenous knowledge with sentences like “Indigenous people were highly skilled at navigating and surviving in the “wilderness,” we present an oxymoron. Were Indigenous peoples other than human? If it is wilderness, how can people inhabit it? Allowing this paradox to stand sustains questions that should long ago have been taken off life support, but that retain vibrancy in powerful arenas, not the least of which include our courts: Were these “organized societies” living in the wilderness? Did these people have “exclusive use and occupation” of the wilderness? The absurdity of these questions comes clear when we jettison “wilderness” for more appropriate language, something like “homeland” or better yet, the people’s own term, the hahuułni of the Nuu-chah-nulth, Haa Aani among the Tlingit, or Anishinaabe akiiing. Kimmerer tells us, “When we call a place by its name it is transformed from wilderness to homeland.”

https://thetyee.ca/Opinion/2018/09/28/Relations-Indigenous-Peoples-Europeans/?utm_source=national&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=280918

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