Should A Self-Driving Car Kill Its Passengers In A “Greater Good” Scenario?

“Picture the scene: You’re in a self-driving car and, after turning a corner, find that you are on course for an unavoidable collision with a group of 10 people in the road with walls on either side. Should the car swerve to the side into the wall, likely seriously injuring or killing you, its sole occupant, and saving the group? Or should it make every attempt to stop, knowing full well it will hit the group of people while keeping you safe?”

http://www.iflscience.com/technology/should-self-driving-car-be-programmed-kill-its-passengers-greater-good-scenario

Would You Pull the Trolley Switch? Does it Matter? The lifespan of a thought experiment

“A runaway streetcar is hurtling towards five unsuspecting workers. Do you pull a switch to divert the trolley onto another track, where only one man works alone? Or do you do nothing?”

http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2015/10/trolley-problem-history-psychology-morality-driverless-cars/409732/?mc_cid=bed065a83a&mc_eid=34e2887073

Justice Episode 1: The Moral Side of Murder

Episode 1 of Michael Sandel’s acclaimed course, Justicetitled, The Moral Side of Murder. From the episode description:

“If you had to choose between (1) killing one person to save the lives of five others and (2) doing nothing, even though you knew that five people would die right before your eyes if you did nothing—what would you do? What would be the right thing to do? That’s the hypothetical scenario Professor Michael Sandel uses to launch his course on moral reasoning.”

http://www.justiceharvard.org/2011/03/episode-01/#watch